Completed – Palatki Wrap

I really enjoyed this project and the yarn.  The yarn is a very soft “Desert Bloom Yarn” available from Sedona Knit Wits  (see previous post for more info).

This was my first attempt at Mosaic Knitting (there are MANY posts about this technique – a quick Google search will provide both videos and blog posts). It was fast, enjoyable, and kept my interest – particularly, this southwest-style pattern.

I forgot that the yarn is a silk blend, and I was a bit aggressive in blocking.  The final product is still lovely and soft, but definitely without any give.

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Casting On- New Techniques- Palatki Wrap

When I travel, I try to find and visit local yarn shops to see what is being manufactured (or dyed) locally.  On our December trip to Sedona, AZ (one of my favorite spots for hiking!) I visited Sedona Knit Wits and was not disappointed.

The store is typical of most LYS I visit when traveling – a small shop in a strip mall.  Like most, it had a “knitting table” where knitting groups or classes can congregate.  This table was right inside the front door and was full of ladies knitting and chatting.  The store is well stocked and very welcoming, with a knowledgable sales person ready to answer any questions.  If you are ever in Sedona – don’t miss this stop!

The yarn is Desert Bloom Yarn, an Arizona-dyed yarn that is named for the local flora and culture.  The colors are Indian Blanket (the brown with red tones) and Ironwood (the grey).  Unfortunately, the day the picture was taken was dark and cloudy, so the artificial light makes the brown look more orange, and the dark grey looks more brown.  The yarn is fingering and works up to a very soft and drapey fabric.  I look forward to the blocked finished project.

The pattern is Palatki Wrap, by Sandra Butler, available for purchase from Ravelry.  Not only was there a sample in the store which immediately caught my eye, but the designer herself was knitting with the group at the table!  Talk about your local culture!

This wrap is knit in mosaic style, with the pattern color changes made with slipped stitches.  It is a very easy, fast, and enjoyable technique, and this particular pattern is soothing and rhythmic to knit.  I’m enjoying this so much that I  regret not trying this technique earlier.

Palatki Wrap 2019-02-01.jpg

Come to Sedona for the view – stay for the knitting!  Sedona Trail Hiking.jpg

Pashimina Wrap

This is a beautiful wrap pattern from John Brinegar, available free on Ravelry.  Pashimina is a generous and drapey wrap that will work well with many styles.

The yarn is Artful Yarns Lustro in color 3903.  The yarn is discontinued, and I purchased it years ago for a sweater, but never liked how it swatched up for that purpose, so it languished in my stash.

The colors for this yarn are a three-ply of forest green and brown wrapped in a gold netting-style ply.   I wasn’t happy with how it worked up for a sweater, but I think I’m going to like the wrap.

Pashimina 1.jpgPashimina 2.jpg

 

Trellis Leaf Stole (WIP)

This is Trellis Leaf Stole from the book Lace One-Skein Wonders book by Judith Durant (Editor) and one of the “One-Skein Wonders” books, of which I have several.

The yarn is a single-ply, cotton, hand-dyed yarn I found at the Richmond, Indiana yarn store, Ply Fiber Arts.  Unfortunately, I’ve mislaid the tag, so I can’t tell you about the artist.  This is, technically, a one-skein project, though the yarn is 800+ yards.

Ply Fiber Arts is located in downtown Richmond and is a terrific boutique-style yarn store.  The website photo is representative of the bright, spacious shop, with plenty of lovely specialty and premium yarns.  If you get over to Richmond, I recommend you stop for a visit.

Richmond, Indiana, is also the southern-most point of the Cardinal Greenway, which is a biking path from Richmond to Marion.  My friend B and I have enjoyed biking on that trail more than once (though we have never gone the full 60 miles from Richmond).

While I’m enjoying this project (the size 2 needles are a nice switch from the size 10 needles for other projects), I’m not as fond of the yarn as I hoped.  This is another example of yarn that looks better on the hank than it does knit up.  It’s a lovely color but the stripes are too narrow and busy.  I’m hoping that the finished project “blends” with whatever it’s worn with, and is not so distracting.

This is why I keep telling myself to skip the novelty yarns – they usually don’t work up as well as I imagine (or, I am not imaginative enough to work them up properly – either could be true).

Hanami (Modified)

Posting has been sparse, lately, due to day-job workload.  However, knitting continues, and I currently favor endless rhythm and repetition to relax in the evenings.

This is Hanami, by Melani Gibbons, $6.00 on Ravelry.  The full pattern is intended to be more ethereal and transitions from the basket weave you see below to an effect of cherry blossoms blowing in the wind.  I chose to stick with the basket weave pattern, and the yarn is more suited for a warm wrap.

Yarn is KnitPicks Palette line, in color Camel Heather.  This intended as a gift for someone that favors darker monotones, but it’s also something I would gladly keep for myself.  The yarn is comfortable, and the wrap will be warm without being heavy.

I want to make this a generous size, so I’ll probably use all 8 balls (231 yds/50 g).  I’ll share the final blocked size.  The yarn balls you see are the last two, so I’ll probably complete this project before the end of tax season (which is how I measure goals in the spring).

Hanami 1Hanami 2

Note about using a tablet for the pattern – this particular pattern is printed “small” on the document – I would be frustrated if I had printed it to paper.  By using a tablet, I can zoom into the pattern, which makes it much easier to follow.